Optimal baby-making positions for the space challenged

No space? No worries! With these novel positions, you don’t need a bed to make a baby ― promise!

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Everyone yearns to have that perfect story to boast about of how their baby was conceived during a romantic getaway or their honeymoon. That the action took place in a king-sized bed in a swanky five-star hotel featuring 800-thread count Egyptian cotton sheets against a background sound of crashing waves.

The truth is, not everyone can escape to the Maldives or turn their gorgeous mansion into a baby-making playground. In fact, most Singaporeans don’t live in mansions!

“When time and space are limited, it's an opportunity to get creative and try new things.”

The good news is that anyone can make any space ― big or small ― into a veritable love nest with a little creativity and a lot of imagination. After all, SmartParents’ gynae expert Dr Christopher Chong, a consultant obstetrician, gynaecologist and urogynaecologist at Gleneagles Hospital, did once point out that “the most powerful sex organ” you have at your disposal is your brain.

Marriage and family therapist Anoushka Beh has this to say, “When time and space are limited, it's an opportunity to get creative and try new things. We continue to grow and evolve in all areas of our lives and sexual intimacy should be approached just the same. My advice ― make it the right place and time, and most importantly, have fun ― who knows what you might discover about yourself and each other in the process.”

So, light some candles, crank up some Marvin Gaye and make the most of your tight quarters. Need some inspiration? Check out these sizzling techniques…

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Infographic: Lim Jae-Lynn

Photo: iStock

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