“After losing my hearing, I couldn’t hear my baby cry”

Ida Sulaiman struggles to look after her baby after she lost most of her hearing because of a genetic disorder…

  After losing my hearing, I couldn’t hear my baby cry ida2

“My name is Ida and Iʼm 27 years old. I have a son, Harraz, who is turning 2, with my husband Haziq, 29, an electrician with Singapore Power.

Harraz is an active toddler who enjoys learning new things. He loves dancing and music. As my husband works shift hours, we don’t get to spend that much time together as a family, but when we do, we usually enjoy going out to eat and window shop.

Sometimes, we take Harraz to waterparks and indoor playgrounds. If we stay home, we enjoy playing with him and dancing to songs together.

While we are like most regular families, the difference is, I am 80 per cent deaf. This is because I have NF2, or Neurofibromatosis Type 2. Itʼs usually a hereditary condition but it

could also be a "spontaneous mutation" of  the gene cell as it is in my case.

Itʼs usually a hereditary condition but it

could also be a "spontaneous mutation" of  the gene cell as it is in my case.”

This means that I am the first in my family to get it. I have tumours growing on my nerves and they are present mostly in the brain and along my spine. There is no cure, so unless they are causing problems or growing bigger, they are left alone, untouched.

I found out about my condition in 2001, when I was 12. I started having tinnitus in my left year. This is a perception of noise or ringing in the ear. After going to the doctor, a tumour was found on the auditory nerve of my ear.

Once the tumour was removed, the nerve was already been damaged, hence, my hearing loss. For seven years, I relied on the hearing in my right ear, since I could not hear from my left ear. But after that, the hearing on my right started to get affected the same way.