7 easy ways to help junior kick their pacifier habit

Help your child avoid the unsightly outcome of their pacifier obsession with our tried-and-tested tactics.

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When Sarah Goh’s 2-month-old son started crying whenever she changed his soiled diapers at night, she’d reach for a pacifier. Goh, 31, says, “It’s a no-brainer because it’ll definitely stop his cries from getting louder.”

Indeed, parents look to pacifiers to soothe bubba since these are portable and easy to use.

Sucking on a pacifier can actually calm your child’s raging emotions as opposed to just silencing their cries.

Explains Dr Wong Boh Boi, Thomson Medical’s senior ParentCraft educator, “It’s called comfort sucking. That’s why the pacifier can usually be given to your child to help him fall asleep.”

“Pacifiers will stop them from crying which causes more air to enter their system, worsening their colic.”

In fact, infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) are readily given pacifiers when they cry as excessive crying can have detrimental effects on the oxygen levels in their body, Dr Wong notes. Pacifiers are also great if your munchkin tends to be colicky in the evenings.

She points out, “Pacifiers will stop them from crying which causes more air to enter their system, worsening their colic.” Pop one in the fridge to cool and you can use it as a teether to relieve your teething child’s sore gums, she adds.

If you’re still breastfeeding, your kewpie’s obsession with his pacifier can also lead to nipple confusion. Dr Wong explains that the way a baby sucks on the pacifier is different from how they get milk from your breast — through a deep latch. So, an ability to nurse successfully can cause them to be fussy.