A pregnant woman's guide to travelling

Everything you need to know before you depart for that much anticipated babymoon with your beloved.

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You and your hubby are ecstatic to receive thrilling news that you’re expecting! If you’ve always loved travelling, you might want to plan a babymoon.

Indeed, it’ll be the last holiday you’ll enjoy together as a couple before baby makes three.

But before you rush off to pack your bags, you might want to take note of a few things you’ll need to take note of and plan ahead for. Here’s our comprehensive guide.

Fit to travel

First up, get your gynaecologist’s blessing to ensure that you are medically fit to travel. The best time for your getaway is in the second trimester when morning sickness symptoms would have subsided, the pregnancy’s become more stable and your energy levels are higher. It is important to let your doctor know your travel plans, so that you’ll get relevant medical guidance as well as that letter that verifies that you’re fit to travel.

Check the fine print

* By air
Most airlines have a list of requirements for expectant travellers. In the case of Singapore Airlines, if you are between 29 and 36 weeks gone in an uncomplicated single pregnancy, you only have to produce a medical certificate indicating your fitness to travel, how many weeks you are pregnant and estimated date of delivery.

Do note that the airline will not let you fly if you are more than 36 weeks pregnant. It is 32 weeks if you are carrying twins and more.

The best time for your getaway is in the second trimester when morning sickness symptoms would have subsided, the pregnancy’s become more stable and your energy levels are higher.

* By sea
If you are planning to book a cruise instead, be aware that most international cruise lines will not accept passengers who have entered their 24th week of pregnancy at any point during the trip. You must also produce a doctor’s letter declaring that you’re fit to travel and your expected due date. However, different cruise lines have their own policies, so do check these details carefully before you book.

Buy travel insurance

Travel insurance is a must-buy before you go on holiday, and pregnancy is no exception. But the level of cover you get and the small-print exclusions will vary from insurer to insurer, so do read through the terms and conditions before buying any travel insurance policy. Don’t worry ― pregnancy is not an illness, which means that being pregnant will not make it harder for you to get coverage, nor will you be charged extra.

Pick your destination

Now that you’ve gotten the hard facts out of the way, the fun begins. Decide where you would like to go and the type of holiday you want. If your previous trips were adrenaline pumping and strenuous, you might want to change gears now that you have a baby bump to take care of. If you still need to stay active. Go for gentle exercises such as walking, swimming and yoga.

It also makes sense to avoid regions that often get travel warnings or those that have been flagged as posing a high risk of illness and disease.

If you prefer not to be confined in an airplane seat for long hours, opt for destinations closer to home (flights less than six hours are good) and which have similar standards of medical care.

Another point worth considering: pregnant women tend to have higher body temperatures and if you perspire easily, you are likely to suffer even more now. So, plan your holiday venue carefully if you prefer to stay cool.